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I’ll be 66 on 1/27/19; when do I apply to get my benefits? Is Social Security Benefits taxed?

Q) I’ll be 66 on 1/27/19; when do I apply to get my benefits? Also. if there is no other income involved , is Social Security Benefits taxed?

A) According to the Social Security Administration:
You must be at least 61 years and 9 months old to apply for retirement benefits.
You must be at least 61 years and 9 months old to apply for retirement benefits.
If you are already age 62, you may be able to start your benefits in the month you apply.
You should apply for benefits no more than four months before the date you want your benefits to start.
Benefits are paid the month after they are due. (If your benefits start in April, you will receive your first benefit payment in May.)
If you are not getting Social Security and you are not ready to retire, you should still use our online retirement benefit application to sign up for just Medicare three months before your 65th birthday.
Source: https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/applying8.html




Paying Taxes On Social Security According to the Social Security Administration:
Some people have to pay federal income taxes on their Social Security benefits. This usually happens only if you have other substantial income (such as wages, self-employment, interest, dividends and other taxable income that must be reported on your tax return) in addition to your benefits.

No one pays federal income tax on more than 85 percent of his or her Social Security benefits based on Internal Revenue Service (IRS) rules. If you:

  • file a federal tax return as an “individual” and your combined income * is
    between $25,000 and $34,000, you may have to pay income tax on up to 50 percent of your benefits.
    more than $34,000, up to 85 percent of your benefits may be taxable.
  • file a joint return, and you and your spouse have a combined income * that is
    between $32,000 and $44,000, you may have to pay income tax on up to 50 percent of your benefits
    more than $44,000, up to 85 percent of your benefits may be taxable.
  • are married and file a separate tax return, you probably will pay taxes on your benefits.

Source: https://www.ssa.gov/planners/taxes.html

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